Texts


The Shoah in Ukraine: Truth and Friendship

Summary: The Shoah in Ukraine had specific features that have branded and were branded by the millennial relations between Jews and Ukrainians. This long history bears great obstacles as well as great potentials to a shared narrative between the two people. I would like to assess them under three headings. 1) Thepervasive nature of lies and legends create a special difficulties for the recovery of such a shared narrative, difficulties which are far beyond the average pattern of divided memories. The memory of huge and tragic events is plagued by denial, censorshipand legends at a very deep and global level.

APPEAL FOR RECOGNITION OF THE 1946 LVIV ‘SYNOD’ AS A SHAM

On March 10, 1946, at Lviv, the Orthodox Church of Russia, under pressure from the Soviet government, forcefully integrated the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and claimed jurisdiction over it. When the participants in the synod on March 8 and 9, voted for the “reunification” of their Church with the Patriarchate of Moscow, all the Ukrainian Greek Catholic bishops were behind bars in prisons. The 216 priests and 19 laymen, assembled in the Cathedral of Saint George in Lviv by the NKVD, the ancestor of the KGB, were at the mercy of a “group of initiative” led by two Orthodox bishops, Antony Pelvetsky and Myhailo Melnyk, and an orthodox priest Gavril Kostelnyk.

A Russian Insight on the Russian Tragedy

You must rush at Andrei Zvyaguintsev films if you have not seen them yet, notably The Banishment and Leviathan. Zvyaguintsev is a towering artist, the beauty and the expressive force of his pictures are constantly staggering. Although often mute and elliptical, difficult to articulate, they convey the clearest understanding, exactly like music. Take for instance, in Leviathan, the excavators demolishing the hero’s house, iron faced cold dinosaurs of injustice. Like all great art, it goes beyond a single explicit message (in Leviathan, it would be the corruption of local politicians and Courts) and offers a deeper human significance. Any interpretation is then partial compared to the thick meaning of his films.

Svetlana Alexievich: The Truth in Many Voices

October 12, 2015 Timothy Snyder Jean Gaumy/Magnum Photos The Chernobyl nuclear power station, May 2008 It is right, but also not quite right, to celebrate the journalist and contemporary historian, Svetlana Alexievich, this year’s laureate of the Nobel Prize in Literature, as a Belarusian writer. The force of her work, the source of its power […]

«…There is nothing but music»

Constantin Sigov «It isn’t obligatory to listen – there’s nothing but the music» – with this unpretentious joke the composer presents us his new discs. Release from the slightest shade of deliberateness helps us to remove the wrapper from this thin disc of real generosity. From what horn of plenty these marvelous gifts came? Maybe it is not […]

The Real Reason Russia Is ‘Helping’ Syria

Eighteen months ago, when Russia seized Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula, confusion prevailed in the West. Today, as Russia sends troops, armor, and aircraft to Syria, we are once again perplexed. On Monday President Vladimir Putin provided the explanation: Russia’s intervention is aimed to defeat ISIS and reduce the flow of refugees to Europe. A review of the last major Russian intervention, in Ukraine, might help us to evaluate this claim.

Edge of Europe, End of Europe

(RU) «Тема столкновения российской дезинтеграции и европейской интеграции хорошо знакома украинцам. В украинском Харькове, на расстоянии менее двадцати миль от российской границы, проживал один из мыслителей, видевших в перспективе этот долгий процесс интеллектуального взаимодействия. Юрий Шевелёв…». Один из самых известных западных историков, специализирующихся на странах Восточной Европы, — Тимоти Снайдер — в статье «Edge of Europe, End of Europe» для New York Review of Books упоминает Харьков и делает параллели между Мыколой Хвылевым и Сергеем Жаданом. «МедиаПорт» публикует полный перевод материала.

For my European friends

30.07.2015 Igor Solomadin “We had no idea how people live in China,” – confessed to me one of the participants of the left movement in Europe, which came out to protest against capitalism under the Maoist slogans in the late 1960s. Maoism was then fashionable among the young and not so young (e.g., French philosopher […]

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